Get the AI insights you need to drive results in your business.

“Get the AI insights you need to drive results in your business.

As AI industrializes beyond research, production quality implementation becomes increasingly important. Business leaders now deploy AI models at scale, and software applications with inference capabilities are accelerating at an unprecedented rate. Find out how early adopters are gaining an edge—at the expense of slower moving competitors—at the AI Conference in New York.

You’ll get an insider’s look at the latest developments in AI, including:

• Faster, specialized hardware for sensing, model training, and model inference

• Cloud and on-premise tools for building AI applications online and on the edge (including mobile)

• AI Business Summit, with executive briefings on the most impactful AI implementations for your business

• New architectures and pipelines

• Proven best practices and detailed case studies

• Ethics and security guidelines

• Deep-dive training courses

• And an amazing lineup of speakers

It’s a rare opportunity to bypass the hype and discover how emerging developments can be applied into practical and profitable AI you can implement in your business today.”

https://conferences.oreilly.com/artificial-intelligence/ai-ny

A New York City lawmaker is taking on companies that mine your face -FastCompany

[Photo: Randallbritten/Wikimedia Commons]

  • “Amazon has lately courted controversy with its Rekognition service, a facial scanning software used by law enforcement agencies like ICE, as well as many of its other cloud customers. Facebook is well known for its facial recognition algorithm, allowing the company to identify users and target ads at them accordingly.
  • Last month, Microsoft’s president called for rules around face recognition, while Google said it would not yet sell facial recognition services for the time being, given the ongoing privacy and ethical concerns.
  • In March, the same month that the Times described MSG’s technology, the ACLU asked 20 of America’s top retailers if they used facial recognition on their customers.
  • All but two of the companies refused to confirm or deny. One company, Ahold Delhaize–a brand that owns supermarkets Food Lion, Stop & Shop, Giant, and Hannaford–responded they did not use face recognition, while the hardware company Lowes said it does use face recognition technology to identify shoplifters.
  • “Since there is no regulation, since there is not even the most basic standards of transparency, we don’t know how widespread the use of facial recognition technology is in New York City or elsewhere in the country–we just don’t know,” he says. ‘Businesses are under no obligation to report on the use of facial recognition technology. I think that is part of the purpose of the bill: to shed light on a world of biometric technology that has historically been hidden from public view.'”

https://www.fastcompany.com/90281673/nyc-face-recognition-law-ritchie-torres